The Academic Minute for 2022.08.01-2022.08.05

 

The Academic Minute from 08.01 – 08.05

Monday, August 1st
Lynn Addington American University
Pandemic Planning With Older Adults in Mind
Lynn A. Addington, JD, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Justice, Law and Criminology at American University in Washington, D.C.  Her research focuses on fatal and non-fatal violent victimization (with an emphasis on understudied victims) and post-victimization responses. Her work also considers the ways to better connect research with practice and policy.  In 2016, she received AU’s top award for faculty research.  Her publications have appeared in a range of outlets including the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Justice Quarterly, and Trauma, Violence and Abuse.

Tuesday, August 2nd
Josh Draper – Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Friendship Cabins
Josh Draper is a professor and architect working at the intersection of material, geometry and fabrication. He joined The Center for Architecture, Science and Ecology (CASE) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in 2014. His teaching and research at CASE is centered on waste materials, architectural research methods and phytoremediation. He received his M. Arch from GSAPP, Columbia University.

Wednesday, August 3rd
Rachel Gevlin – Birmingham-Southern University
What Novels Can Tell Us About Gendered Responses to Adultery
Rachel Gevlin is Assistant Professor of English at Birmingham-Southern College. She received her PhD from Duke University in 2020 and her B.A. from Bennington College in 2010. Dr. Gevlin specializes in the literature and culture of England’s long eighteenth century, with a particular focus on the history of the novel, masculinity studies, and legal histories of marriage and divorce. Her current book project, Divorcing the Rake: Male Chastity and the Rise of the Novel, 1753-1857, examines the intersection of eighteenth-century divorce law with the erasure of male heterosexual conduct in novels from Samuel Richardson’s Sir Charles Grandison to the works of the Brontës. In it, she argues that novels from the 1750s through the 1850s presented narratives of naturalized sexual difference that reinforced gendered biases inherent in divorce laws, generating positive social responses toward men’s pre- and extra-marital sex that were not afforded to women. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in English Literary HistoryEighteenth-Century Life, and The Conversation.

Thursday, August 4th
Adolfo Sequeira – University of California, Irvine
Preventing Suicide Using Biomarkers
Pedro Adolfo Sequeira earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Quebec in molecular biology in 1998. He went on to earn his Master of Science from Montreal University in neurosciences in 2001, and from there his work began to earn him accolades with numerous research awards and scholarships awarded to him. He continued his education in Montreal to earn a PhD in human genetics from McGill University in 2007. He was appointed the Della Martin Fellow from 2006-2011.  His main research interests are genetics, depression, neurology suicide and molecular biology. He joined the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine in 2011 to begin his work as a project scientist and from there has grown into the role of associate professor. He works alongside the Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Disease Research Foundation.

Friday, August 5th
C. Michael White – University of Connecticut
Online Rogue Pharmacies Send Millions of Fake and Dangerous Pills into U.S.
His research interests are in drug, dietary supplement, and substances of abuse safety and effectiveness. His over 440 publications in biomedical journals have been cited over 14,000 times and covered by major media television, radio, newspaper, and internet sites. He has received national awards from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

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